When it comes to renewables, the significant problem is: How do we keep all that strength for use afterwards on? For the reason that such strength is intermittent in mother nature, storing it when there is a surplus is critical to guaranteeing a ongoing supply—for wet days (literally), at night, or when the wind doesn’t blow.

Using today’s lithium-ion batteries for very long-term grid storage is not feasible for a range of factors. For instance, they have mounted demand capacities and really do not maintain demand perfectly in excess of prolonged durations of time. 

The option, some suggest, is to keep strength chemically—in the form of hydrogen fuel—rather than electrically. This will involve employing units referred to as electrolyzers that make use of renewable strength to split h2o into hydrogen and oxygen gas.